Remembering In Durham Region

remember-whitby

Branch 112 Whitby, Ontario

We, as a country, have been observing Remembrance Day since 1919. It was originally called Armistice Day to commemorate the agreement that ended the First World War on Monday November 11, 1918 at 11:00 am. Today it is a day in Canada where we gather together and remember all of the civilians and military personnel who have lost their lives defending our country. It is a somber day but an important one in our history. It is an opportunity to teach our children the importance of remembering those who have fallen before us, and to gather together within our communities, for a moment of silence, to pay our respects and honour the more than 2,300,000 Canadians who have served their country throughout our nation’s history.

Part of Remembrance Day, particularly in the days leading up to November 11th, is the tradition of wearing a poppy. Canadians purchase over 19 million poppies every year! The next time you are out and about, take note of how many people are wearing poppies and in particular, how they are wearing them. Not many people are aware, but there is Poppy wearing etiquette. The do’s and don’ts of wearing the poppy is something we should all pay attention to and try to adhere to. The Royal Canadian Legion’s Poppy Manual lays out the proper etiquette as follows:

  • Changing the pin. The pin sometimes provides wearers some difficulty keeping the poppy on. Some have swapped out the pins for safety pins or even pins with Canadian flag heads on them. The Legion officially states that the pins should not be switched at all but it is better to wear a poppy with a Canadian flag in the centre rather than not wear a poppy at all.
  • Where should the poppy be worn: Ideally, the poppy should be worn on your left lapel because this is closest to your heart. Somewhere on the left side is what the Legion is looking for. Recently, the Toronto Maple Leafs have taken to having poppies painted on the left sides of their helmets.
  • When should the poppy be worn: Most people think of poppies being worn from the last Friday in October right through to Remembrance Day. It is also respectful to wear them at other times of the year including ceremonies to honour veterans, such as funerals.
  • Who should wear a poppy: Anyone who wants to honour a Canadian veteran
  • How many poppies can I wear? Whatever seems correct for you. Most just wear one. Queen Elizabeth II wears several poppies when honouring the dead. Some people want to honour several countries or several veterans so in thoses cases, they wear multiple poppies.
  • What should I do with my poppy after? Placing them at a veteran memorial is showing the utmost of respect. Tossing them on the ground or re-using them for next year is not.

Now that we are clear on how and when to wear a poppy, let’s have a look at where residents of Durham Region can pay their respects this upcoming Remembrance Day which is on Friday November 11, 2016:

Pickering: Pickering City Hall cenotaph, One The Esplanade, 11:00am

Oshawa: Parade starts at RS McLaughlin Armouries at 10:25am, heading down Centre Street, then along John Street, to the Memorial Park cenotaph at 11:00am.

Whitby: Parade starts at 10:20 in front of Branch 112 and arrives at the cenotaph on Dundas for 10:40am.

Brooklin: 1pm service at the Brooklin cenotaph at Luther Vipond Memorial Arena. Also a 3pm service at the Court at Brooklin (5909 Anderson St.)

Newtonville: 10:30 am service at the Newtonville cenotaph.

Orono: service will be at 1:15 at the Rebekah Hall.

Bowmanville: Parade will leave Branch 178 at 10:00 am and will proceed to the cenotaph at town hall.

Port Perry: the Legion will host a Remembrance Day ceremony inside the Scugog Memorial Library at 10:30am.

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